Maui Girl Cooks

“One of the very nicest things about life is the way we must regularly stop whatever it is we are doing and devote our attention to eating.” Luciano Pavarotti


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Refrigerator Confidential Day #2

Welcome to Day #2 of Refrigerator Confidential!  This week, I’m taking you inside our refrigerator so you can see what we buy at the Saturday Upcountry Farmers Market, and what we do with it throughout the week.  It’s kind of a game for us {a very tasty game I might add}, and the goal is to eat all or most of the food by Friday, and end up with lots of empty bags to fill up at the market on Saturday.  Sometimes we are successful, and sometimes we don’t do so well.

Yesterday I told you in words and pictures what we bought at the market.  I didn’t say anything about what else was in the refrigerator.  We had {not an exhaustive list, by any means}:

leftover homemade chili
leftover brown rice
cooked broccoli
homemade mustard vinaigrette
beets, which I cooked and pickled yesterday

Sunday’s Meals with links to recipes:

Breakfast
Me- Nancy’s Low-fat Plain Yogurt with olive oil, salt, pepper, cumin; broccoli with a drizzle of mustard vinaigrette
My husband- Nancy’s Low-fat Plain Yogurt with local honey, dried Maui pineapple, dried Maui apple bananas & coconut flakes, roasted peanuts & walnuts
Freshly Pressed Ginger Kombucha {1 bottle is almost half gone already!}
Green tea

Lunch
Leftover chili & brown rice {they’re almost gone!}
Salad of kale, arugula, pickled beets, Maui onion, Wakame & Ginger Sauerkraut Salad with mustard vinaigrette
Broccoli with olive oil, lemon, salt, pepper, Parmesan and toasted sliced almonds

Dinner
Baked salmon with mayonnaise and Sweet Ginger Chili sauce {similar to Thai sweet chili sauce, but with healthier ingredients}
Caesar salad with homemade croutons and avocado

Pickled Beets
4 fresh beets, scrubbed and steamed until tender {about 45 minutes for medium size beets}
Onion, sliced {as much as you like, or none}
3/4 cup cider vinegar
1/4 cup sugar
1/4 tsp kosher salt
1/4 tsp whole peppercorns
2 small bay leaves {or 1 large}

When beets are tender when pierced with a knife, let them cool until you can handle them comfortably.  Peel off the skins, and cut them into whatever shape you like.  Put them into a container with a tight lid, so you can turn them upside down to distribute the pickling liquid.  If you are using onions, layer them in with the beets.  I usually use a quart mason jar.  In a small saucepan, combine all ingredients and bring them to the boil, stirring to ensure that the sugar gets dissolved.  Pour over beets and onions.  There will not be enough liquid to cover your beets, so turn the container upside down occasionally, and shake to distribute the liquid.  They will get tastier as they marinate longer.

Here is the refrigerator on Day #2:

photo1-4

Bon appétit!

 

 

 


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Refrigerator Confidential

“You probably don’t want to look in the crisper drawer.”  Amanda Freitag Chef and owner of Empire Diner

Welcome to my refrigerator!  I must admit right from the start that I “tidied up” a bit before I let you in.  I’m pretty sure that you would probably do the same, if you were planning to invite me in.  My husband and I cook many/most of our meals together, but I am the Curator of the Refrigerator.  I know what goes in, and its approximate location.  The biggest haul that goes into the refrigerator comes from the Saturday farmers market, and I find a home for all of it-no easy feat to be sure.  My husband goes to the market very early on Saturday mornings, while I go for a nice long walk, during which time I listen to the Splendid Table podcast on my phone.  If you haven’t heard the Splendid Table, I highly recommend that you check it out here.  Anyway, back to our refrigerator.  This week, I would like to show you what our refrigerator looks like, from its early Saturday morning sparseness to bulging at the seams later Saturday morning, then during the week as we eat our way through all the delicious fruits and vegetables, which come mostly from the Upcountry Farmers Market.

I should say that the way we eat requires time and effort…time and effort that we are willing to put into procuring, preparing and eating delicious food.  In no way do I expect that anyone else should necessarily follow our path, because I know that not everyone has the time, desire or knowledge to cook this way.  This is what I love to do, and I’m grateful to have the opportunity to spend my time this way.

EARLY SATURDAY MORNING

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SATURDAY MID-DAY:  Fresh Produce from Upcountry Farmers Market 

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From the market today:  3 bunches green onions, 1 head romaine lettuce, 1 bunch kale, 1 dozen eggs, gardenias, red ginger, 5 beets, 2 white potatoes, 12 apple bananas, purple cabbage, 3 bunches arugula, 1 bunch Swiss chard, 4 jalapeños, 3 green peppers, 1 red pepper, cauliflower, 2 broccolis, 1 bunch celery, 2 artichokes, 1 kabocha squash, 2 bottles of Freshly Pressed Ginger Kombucha

 

 

 

SATURDAY MID-DAY:  Into the Refrigerator!

 

 

SATURDAY AFTERNOON:  Everything in its place!

Check out this article from New York Times Magazine about what 11 top New York chefs have in their refrigerators.

Mark Menjivar wrote a book about what’s in others’ refrigerators; it’s kind of fun to take a peek!  Check it out here.

What’s in your refrigerator?

 

Bon appétit!


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Express Post: Asparagus

This is going to be an express post, because I have a lot of things I want to get done today, but I want to tell you about our new favorite way to eat asparagus . . . just in case you get your hands on some fresh asparagus.  To our great delight, a new crop of Maui-grown asparagus has hit the Upcountry Farmers Market!  If asparagus isn’t available in your area just yet, don’t fret-spring is coming your way soon.  Just for the record, I love thick spears of asparagus;  I want to know that I am biting into something.  We enjoy asparagus steamed, then topped with freshly squeezed lemon/lime juice, freshly ground salt and pepper and homemade mayonnaise.  It’s also fantastic roasted in a hot oven, after rolling around in some extra virgin olive oil, freshly ground salt and pepper and sprigs of fresh thyme.  I was looking for ideas in my newest Deborah Madison book, Vegetable Literacy, and found a way to cook asparagus that we think is genius, not to mention downright delicious.  It is pretty much the same technique as this green been recipe I shared with you a few months ago, which is our new favorite way to eat green beans.

pan griddled asparagus 2

Griddled Asparagus
adapted from Vegetable Literacy {Madison}

1 bunch asparagus
olive oil, for coating asparagus
kosher salt
Maldon Sea Salt, or other flaky sea salt, to finish
freshly ground pepper

If you are using asparagus with thick spears, peel the lower parts so they will be tender.  Toss the spears with olive oil to coat {you don’t need a lot} and season lightly with salt.  Heat a cast iron skillet over medium high heat.

When the pan is hot, add your asparagus.  Don’t move it around just yet; you want some color to form on the spears that are in contact with the pan.  When you see some beautiful browned spots on your asparagus, toss the spears around in the pan.  You do not need to methodically move them one by one. Keep the heat on medium high and continue cooking the asparagus for several more minutes, until they are tender when poked with a sharp knife.  Some of the larger spears may still be a little al dente {crisp}, but I assure you they will be perfectly delicious.

Serve the griddled asparagus on a platter sprinkled with whatever crunchy salt you have selected.  Although I think it is perfect just like this, without any other additions, Madison suggests rolling the cooked spears around in Tarragon Butter and a few other sauces from her book.  I greatly respect Madison’s opinions when it comes to making delicious food, so I will probably try some of these sauces in the future.

Bon appetit!


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Cranberries for Breakfast

A few tidbits about cranberries. . .
~ The cranberry is native to North America.
~ Cranberries bounce because of air pockets inside the fruit.  They are also called bounceberries.
~ If you were to string all of the cranberries harvested in North America last year, it would reach from Boston to Los Angeles more than 565 times!

Source of information:  http://www.oceanspray.com/Kitchen/Plan-It/Family-Fun/Cranberry-Fun-Facts.aspx

Some time ago, I posted a few ways that we like to eat plain yogurt.  Cranberry season is here, which means we can swirl some raw cranberry orange relish into creamy plain yogurt for a delicious breakfast treat.  Topped with walnuts & a sprinkling of raw cacao nibs, it makes a great breakfast with a piece of toast and some tea.  As I mentioned in a previous post, our favorite yogurt is Nancy’s.

Nancy's Plain Yogurt

Nancy’s Plain Yogurt

When you open up a new yogurt, stir it well until all the lumps are out and it is super creamy.  Add whatever you like to make a healthy and delicious breakfast.

Plain Yogurt with Cranberry Orange Relish & Broken Walnuts

Plain Yogurt with Cranberry Orange Relish & Broken Walnuts

You could stop with the cranberry orange relish {recipe here} and walnuts, or do as I did and sprinkle a few raw cacao nibs over the top.  In one fell swoop, you can boost the taste & the nutrition of your creamy bowl of yogurt.  What a deal!

Try some raw cacao nibs on your bowl of yogurt!

Try some raw cacao nibs on your bowl of yogurt!

I enjoy having some toast with my yogurt.  It adds somewhat of a “savory” bite to counter the yogurt’s sweetness, even though this yogurt isn’t super sweet, since it only contains a bare minimum of sugar.  I wrote about this bread before, but it’s worth revisiting.  It is simple to make & tasty to eat.

Date Walnut Cinnamon Bread

Date Walnut Cinnamon Bread with Star fruit

Better eat it quickly, because the butter is almost melted!  I prefer my butter sitting on top in cold, thin slices.  Mmmmmm!  This bread is just about as good as cinnamon rolls, but a lot easier and quicker to make.  With the cranberry orange relish, more fruit isn’t really required, but the star fruit makes a pretty addition to the plate.  Aren’t they cute?  Star fruit is a tropical fruit whose season runs from July-February in the U.S.  It is a good source of Vitamin C, potassium and fiber.  According to Food Chemistry, star fruit is a good source of antioxidants, particularly the kind found in green tea and red wine.

Date Walnut Cinnamon Bread
adapted from Easy Little Bread

1 1/4 cups / 300 ml warm water (105-115F) 2 teaspoons active dry yeast (one packet)
1 tablespoon runny honey
1 cup/140 grams whole wheat flour
1 cup/100 grams oats
1 cup/125 grams unbleached white flour
3 tsp cinnamon
1 1/2 teaspoons fine grain sea salt
5 dates, snipped into small pieces
1 cup broken walnuts
2 tablespoons butter, melted, for brushing {you probably won’t need it all}

In a medium bowl, sprinkle the yeast onto the warm water and stir until the yeast dissolves. Stir in the honey and set aside for a few minutes, until the yeast blooms and swells a bit – 5 – 10 minutes.

In the meantime, mix the flours, oats, salt, cinnamon, dates and walnuts in a large bowl. Add the wet mixture to the dry and stir very well.

Brush a 9” x 5” loaf pan {8 cup} generously with some of the melted butter. Turn the dough into the tin, cover with a clean, slightly damp cloth, and set in a warm place for 30 minutes, to rise.

Preheat the oven to 350F / 180C, with a rack in the middle. When ready, bake the bread for 35-40 minutes, until golden and pulling away from the sides of the pan. I finish things up by leaving the bread under the broiler for just a heartbeat – to give the top a bit deeper color. Remove from oven, and turn the bread out of the pan quickly. Let it cool on a rack so it doesn’t steam in the pan. Serve warm with butter.

Makes 1 loaf.

Bon appetit!


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“The old Romans having expelled physicians out of their commonwealth, did for many years maintain their health by the use of cabbages, taking them for every disease.”  16th century historian

Welcome to my 3  5 9 day post.  Yep, it took 9 days for me to get this written and posted.  Why??  I have no idea!!  No good reason though, that’s for sure.

I worked late last night {Monday}, so took the opportunity to sleep in a little later than usual, which was nice.  It was a breezy “2 blanket night,” the first one for quite a while.  This morning has been one of those putz around the house mornings where I suddenly realized that my walk would have been significantly cooler had I left earlier.  Podcast selected, I popped in my ear buds, put on my hat, sunglasses and shoes, ready to go.  Open door. . .it’s raining!  You might wonder how I could not have known that.  Weather-wise, we live in a very interesting place.  Dark gray clouds may gloomily loom out one window, with a gleaming blue sky out another window, just 20 feet away.  So often, the gray clouds that hang around our house do not drop rain; I would certainly like a bit more rain, as would our plants.  Funny thing to say, from someone who lived in the Pacific Northwest for over 20 years!  The clouds are splashing rain this morning, and I am enjoying every minute of it.

I’ve had half a cup of green tea, and now it looks like a good time to walk.  Be back soon.

I’m back!  More sprinkles soon after I returned, so I guess my timing was pretty good.  Actually, my walk was timed perfectly, as was my choice of routes.  I found a fallen Meyer lemon {I LOVE Meyer lemons!}, which is a cross between a regular lemon and a Mandarin orange.  Meyer lemons have not been available in the United States until fairly recently, and may not be found everywhere.  If you are a lemon lover, and you see Meyer lemons, buy some; they are so delicious.  I come from a long line of lemon eaters, and I can tell you that my mouth is watering right now.  I love lemons sprinkled with salt-so good {not great for the enamel on your teeth, but so tasty}.  Meyer lemons have a floral quality to them, in their flavor and their aroma.  They are thin-skinned, so you can eat the entire lemon.

Meyer lemon wedgeClick here to read a short article/hear a short interview about Meyer Lemons.  I also found a pommelo.  The owner of the pommelo tree told me a few weeks ago that I could pick what I could reach; score!.  I was thrilled to find one that had blown off in the wind, to my good fortune.  Pommelos are similar to grapefruit, but their fruit is not as soft as a grapefruit, and the flavor is a little different.

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To be continued, tomorrow!

Wednesday- No fallen fruit today, nor rain, just a beautiful blue sky & gentle breeze to keep us nice and cool.

Let’s talk about cabbage.  I love cabbage!  By all accounts, my mom makes fantastic coleslaw.  Even though I like all of the ingredients in her coleslaw, I never cared for it as a kid.  She always gave me a bowl of cabbage with nothing on it, before she mixed in the dressing.  My dad loved her coleslaw because it doesn’t have a sweet dressing.  Here is her recipe.

Mom’s Coleslaw

4 cups finely shredded cabbage
1/2 cup mayonnaise
2 tbsp lemon juice
2 tbsp grated onion
Salt and pepper to taste
Celery seed to taste {my mom says that it is important to use celery seed for best flavor}

My mom always grates her cabbage in a blender, with water, which makes a very fine shred; she said that her mom liked it that way.  After processing in the blender she drains the cabbage well, so the dressing will not be watery.  You can shred your cabbage however you prefer.  Mix the remaining ingredients and mix with the cabbage.  Chill until ready to serve.

My preferred way of eating cabbage has always been cooked, as in corned beef and cabbage, minestrone soup, borscht, etc.  And then I discovered roasted cabbage.  OMG!  Roasting cabbage gives it a depth of flavor that raw cabbage cannot ever hope to achieve.  It is quite delicious, and I have to restrain myself from eating the entire head of cabbage after it emerges from the oven, roasty-toasty brown with soft centers and crispy edges.  Sprinkled with fresh lemon juice, roasted cabbage is delectable and just waiting to be eaten, leaf by leaf, standing up by the stove, where you have put it to cool.  If you manage to have any leftovers, I also find it delicious cold or at room temperature.

Roasted Cabbage with Olive Oil & Lemon
recipe adapted ever so slightly from eat.repeat

1 head of green cabbage
Extra virgin olive oil
Salt & pepper
Freshly squeezed lemon juice

Pull off the large outer cabbage leaves.   Wash the head of cabbage and dry well.  Cut the cabbage in half, and then cut the halves into fourths, leaving you with 8 wedges.  Try to keep a bit of the core on each wedge, so that the wedges have a better chance of staying together.  Put your cabbage wedges on a sheet pan lined with foil.  I like to line my sheet pan with foil to make clean up a little easier.  Brush the cabbage with olive oil and sprinkle with freshly ground salt and pepper.  Roast in a 400 degree oven for 30-40 minutes, flipping the wedges about halfway through.  Roast until the cabbage is browned, even to the point of the edges being crispy brown {much tastier this way!}.   Sprinkle cabbage with lemon juice & eat hot, warm, room temperature or cold.  Yum!

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Bon appetit!